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N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources

NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Water Quality - Neuse

Water Quality

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Neuse Nutrient Strategy:  Introduction
Eutrophication became a water quality concern in the lower Neuse River basin in the late 1970s and early 1980s.  Nuisance algal blooms prevalent in the upper estuary prompted investigations by DWQ.  These investigations, as well as other studies, indicated that algal growth was being stimulated by excess nutrients entering the estuarine waters of the Neuse River.  In 1988 the lower Neuse River basin received the supplemental classification of nutrient sensitive waters (NSW).  As part of this early nutrient strategy, new and expanding NPDES discharges, as well as existing facilities with design flows greater than 0.05 MGD, were given a quarterly average phosphorus limit of 2 mg/l.  Phosphorus loading was greatly reduced and algal blooms in the river and freshwater portions of the estuary were reduced as a result of this action.
 
The 1993 Neuse River Basinwide Water Quality Plan recognized that eutrophication continued to be a water quality problem in the estuary below New Bern.  Extensive fish kills in 1995 prompted further study of the problem.  Low dissolved oxygen levels associated with algal blooms were determined to be a probable cause of many of the fish kills.  Researchers also determined that the toxic dinoflagellate, Pfiesteria piscida, may have been responsible for many of the fish kills.
 
The algal blooms and correspondingly high levels of chlorophyll a prompted DWQ to place the Neuse River estuary on the 1994 303(d) list of impaired waters.  In 1996, the NC Senate Select Committee on River Water Quality and Fish Kills sponsored a workshop with numerous scientists familiar with the Neuse River water quality problems.  The group reached consensus that a 30 percent reduction in total nitrogen entering the estuary was a good starting goal to reduce the extent and duration of algal blooms.  In 1996, the 30 percent reduction was put into law (Session Laws 1995, Section 572).  The state funded the Neuse Modeling and Monitoring Project (MODMON) to quantitatively assess the interactions and pathways between nutrients, phytoplankton and dissolved oxygen in the estuary.  A Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) was developed in two stages and approved by EPA in 2002 to address the nitrogen overloading to the estuary. A TMDL is a calculation of the maximum amount of a pollutant that a waterbody can receive and still meet water quality standards, and an allocation of that load among the various sources of that pollutant. The TMDL developed for the Neuse estuary showed a 30% reduction in nitrogen loading is needed.
 
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission (EMC) adopted a comprehensive set of permanent rules that became effective August 1, 1998 to implement the Neuse Nutrient Strategy. While individual implementation dates varied, all of the rules were fully implemented by 2003. 
 

 

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