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N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources

NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Coastal Management - quarterone2013

Coastal Management

NCDCM CAMAgram, 1st Quarter 2013

Director's Note:
As the new year unfolds, Coastal Management and the Coastal Resources Commission are hard at work on several initiatives, including three studies that are required by Session Law 2012-202 -- an update to a 2010 report on sea-level rise; a study of the feasibility of creating a new Area of Environmental Concern for lands adjacent to the mouth of the Cape Fear River; and a study of the feasibility of eliminating beachfront Inlet Hazard Areas of Environmental Concern. We have engaged the Commission’s Science Panel on Coastal Hazards to begin work on the Inlet Hazard Area and sea-level rise studies, with the goal of providing final reports to the General Assembly in 2015 and 2016, respectively.

In addition, the division recently completed a comprehensive, internal review of coastal management rules and policies. We have suggested changes in six key areas that should help streamline some of our permits and processes, and hopefully make things easier for our customers while maintaining riparian property rights, public trust rights, and environmental integrity. Draft rule changes will be presented to the Commission at its next meeting.

We are also seeing an increasing trend in coastal permit applications, with development activity picking up coastwide. We hope that this trend will continue, and we look forward to another busy and productive year at the Division of Coastal Management!

Please feel free to share this newsletter with colleagues and friends, and let us know if you have any suggestions for future newsletters. If you would like to have your name added or removed from the email list, please email your request toMichele.Walker@ncdenr.gov. Additional coastal program information can also be found on our web site,http://www.nccoastalmanagement.net.

Braxton Davis, Director, NC Division of Coastal Management

In this Issue:

  • DCM Rules Review Yields Proposals for Rule Changes in 2013

  • DCM Water Monitoring Station Sheds Light on Cause of Fish Kill

  • New Oceanfront Erosion Rates Effective Feb. 1

  • Sandbag Rules Move Forward

  • Join the Coastal Reserve for Summer Science School

  • Staff Kudos

  • Legislative Update

  • Legal Update

DCM Rules Review Yields Proposals for Rule Changes in 2013
The Division of Coastal Management recently completed a comprehensive review of the Coastal Resources Commission’s rules and policies, along with the division’s procedures for processing and making decisions on Coastal Area Management Act permits. This review resulted in suggested changes in six key areas that would help reduce regulatory burdens for our customers:

  • Streamlining CAMA general permits for docks and piers by increasing the number of vessels allowed under a general permit for small-scale docking facilities from two to four;

  • Streamlining general permits for boat ramps in order to simplify permitting for applicants and reduce costs;

  • Streamlining permits for inlet dredging activities;

  • Reducing the regulatory burden related to beach fill projects, by reducing sampling requirements for certain types of beach fill projects and clarifying minimum standards for sediment compatibility and project monitoring;

  • Streamlining public notice and adjacent property owner notification requirements; and

  • Expanding the general permit for wetland, stream and buffer mitigation to cover projects undertaken by private sector organizations.

DCM will work with the CRC to move forward with these suggested changes during 2013.

For more information, contact Ted Tyndall atTed.Tyndall@ncdenr.gov.

DCM Water Monitoring Station Sheds Light on Cause of Fish Kill
Last month, hundreds of thousands of dead Atlantic Menhaden washed ashore at the Masonboro Island National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) in Wilmington. The fish did not appear to be diseased or sick, so what happened to them?

A monitoring station maintained by the Coastal Reserve in the area where the fish were found helped provide the answer. 

As part of a national network of estuary monitoring stations (NERR System-wide Monitoring Program), DCM maintains a monitoring station in the area where the fish kill occurred. The station continuously monitors the water for dissolved oxygen levels, temperature and pH levels, among other data. The station recorded a significant drop in dissolved oxygen levels in the early morning hours of Jan. 8.

Based on the station’s data, it appears the fish clustered by the thousands in a narrow area at Loosins Creek, causing dissolved oxygen levels in the water to plummet to nearly zero in less than one hour, killing the fish. This situation has been occasionally observed in winter months, and occurs when the menhaden begin to tighten their school, possibly due to the presence of predators.

“This may be the first time we have had continuous monitoring of water quality in an area at the exact time of a fish kill,” said Jim Gregson, Surface Water Protection supervisor for the state Division of Water Quality. “The data recorded by Coastal Management’s monitoring station was a big help in determining the cause of this event.”

For more information, contact Byron Toothman atToothmanb@uncw.edu.

New Oceanfront Erosion Rates Effective Feb. 1
Updated long-term average annual erosion rates for North Carolina’s oceanfront have been approved by the Coastal Resources Commission and became effective Feb. 1, 2013.

A long-term average annual erosion rate is the average amount of erosion that occurs each year over a period of about 50 years. By measuring movement of the ocean shoreline over a long period of time, the Division of Coastal Management is able to get a more accurate representation of the net shoreline change, taking into account normal shoreline movement, beach nourishment and storms.

DCM uses long-term average annual erosion rates in determining setback distances for oceanfront construction. Setbacks are measured from the first line of stable natural vegetation, or static vegetation line where applicable.

The newly adopted erosion rates are not substantially different from the rates adopted in 2003, as most of the oceanfront shoreline demonstrated very little change when compared to results from the previous study. From a regulatory standpoint, the new erosion rates, or setback factors, did not change for 64 percent of the shoreline.

For more information, contact Ken Richardson atKen.Richardson@ncdenr.gov.

Sandbag Rules Move Forward
The Coastal Resources Commission in February approved amendments to its rules governing the use of sandbag structures in communities that are actively pursuing beach nourishment, inlet relocation or inlet stabilization projects. The rule changes would extend the time limit for sandbag structures from five to eight years, and would also remove the once-per-structure restriction for sandbags provided the property becomes imminently threatened again.

The rule amendments must be approved by the state’s Rules Review Commission before they become effective.

Join the Coastal Reserve for Summer Science School
The N.C. Coastal Reserve is partnering with the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort to offer Summer Science School for children. The following programs will be sponsored by the N.C. Coastal Reserve:

Preschool Story Time & Crafts (Free, registration required)
Monday, June 10, 9 – 10 a.m.
Monday, July 8, 9 – 10 a.m.
Monday, August 5, 9 – 10 a.m.

Seashore Life ($50)
Monday & Tuesday, June 17 & 18, 9 a.m. – noon
Monday & Tuesday, July 15 & 16, 9 a.m. – noon
Thursday & Friday, August 1 & 2, 9 a.m. – noon

For more detailed information about all the programs offered, or to register, download theSummer Science School brochure, or contact education coordinator Lori Davis atlori.davis@ncdenr.gov.

Staff Kudos
In each newsletter we like to highlight recent kudos for our staff. Kelly Russell, field representative in DCM’s Elizabeth City office, recently received this comment in an email from a local homeowner:

“And a special ‘thank you’ for all your efforts and those of your Supervisors in assisting the Buxton oceanfront homeowners with post-Sandy restorations.”

DCM’s attorney Christine Goebel received a compliment from a petitioner in a recent variance case:

“Thanks for your support again helping me to understand the rules along the way.  Was quite helpful...”

Coastal Training Coordinator Whitney Jenkins received this email from a frequent workshop attendee:

“I appreciate how wonderful your seminars are.  I wished I could have made the last one in Jacksonville at Sturgeon City (New River Roundtable Collaborative Learning Training, October 18, 2012).  I heard it was awesome!“

DCM is always proud of our staff’s commitment to providing all of our customers with the very best in customer service.

Legislative Update
The following bills affecting Coastal Management have been introduced in the General Assembly:

SB 10 – Government Reorganization and Efficiency Act:  Makes changes to several state boards and commissions, including the Coastal Resources Commission and Coastal Resources Advisory Council. Ends the terms of current members of both the CRC and CRAC. The House version of this bill retains four current CRC members until June 30, 2014. Reduces the CRC from 15 members to 13 (House version; Senate version reduces CRC from 15 to 11), and alters requirements for commissioners. CRC appointments, now all made by the governor, would change to some appointed by the governor and some by the General Assembly. Reduces the CRAC from 45 to 20 members. Eliminates CRAC agency appointments currently made by state department heads and others, and gives that authority to the Coastal Resources Commission. The House passed its version of the bill on March 5. The Senate did not concur with the House changes. The bill will now go to conference committee.

SB 32/HB 74 – Periodic Review and Expiration of Rules:  Expires all environmental rules, including those of the CRC, unless the rules are readopted before Dec. 31, 2017, or within 10 years of a rule’s most recent amendment.

SB 58 – Increase Funding for Dredging:  Establishes the Shallow Draft Inlet Dredging Fund, generated from increased fees for boat registration.

SB 76 – Domestic Energy Jobs Act: Makes several changes to the 2012 law opening the state to shale-gas drilling and encourages offshore drilling exploration.

SB 151 – Coastal Policy Reform Act of 2013:Section 4 gives local governments authority to enforce public trust rights on ocean beaches seaward of the mean high water mark.

Legal Update of Active Cases

Cases in the North Carolina Court of Appeals:

The Riggings HOA v. CRC(New Hanover 09 CVS 2761) - Judicial review of the CRC’s denial of a variance on re-hearing to allow expired sandbags to remain with no definite end date.

Busik v. CRC and 1118 Longwood(Brunswick 11 CVS 2596) - CRC’s Final Agency Decision regarding the interpretation of the ocean erosion setback rule (15A NCAC 7H .0306).

Cases in Wake County Superior Court:
Defenders of Wildlife & NWRA v. CRC (12 CVS 16364) – Appeal by Petitioners of the CRC Chairman’s denial of their request for a hearing in OAH to challenge the Bonner Bridge Replacement CAMA Permit, pursuant to 113A-121.1.

NCDCM CAMAgram, 1st Quarter 2013

Director's Note:
As the new year unfolds, Coastal Management and the Coastal Resources Commission are hard at work on several initiatives, including three studies that are required by Session Law 2012-202 -- an update to a 2010 report on sea-level rise; a study of the feasibility of creating a new Area of Environmental Concern for lands adjacent to the mouth of the Cape Fear River; and a study of the feasibility of eliminating beachfront Inlet Hazard Areas of Environmental Concern. We have engaged the Commission’s Science Panel on Coastal Hazards to begin work on the Inlet Hazard Area and sea-level rise studies, with the goal of providing final reports to the General Assembly in 2015 and 2016, respectively.

In addition, the division recently completed a comprehensive, internal review of coastal management rules and policies. We have suggested changes in six key areas that should help streamline some of our permits and processes, and hopefully make things easier for our customers while maintaining riparian property rights, public trust rights, and environmental integrity. Draft rule changes will be presented to the Commission at its next meeting.

We are also seeing an increasing trend in coastal permit applications, with development activity picking up coastwide. We hope that this trend will continue, and we look forward to another busy and productive year at the Division of Coastal Management!

Please feel free to share this newsletter with colleagues and friends, and let us know if you have any suggestions for future newsletters. If you would like to have your name added or removed from the email list, please email your request toMichele.Walker@ncdenr.gov. Additional coastal program information can also be found on our web site,http://www.nccoastalmanagement.net.

Braxton Davis, Director, NC Division of Coastal Management

In this Issue:

  • DCM Rules Review Yields Proposals for Rule Changes in 2013

  • DCM Water Monitoring Station Sheds Light on Cause of Fish Kill

  • New Oceanfront Erosion Rates Effective Feb. 1

  • Sandbag Rules Move Forward

  • Join the Coastal Reserve for Summer Science School

  • Staff Kudos

  • Legislative Update

  • Legal Update

DCM Rules Review Yields Proposals for Rule Changes in 2013
The Division of Coastal Management recently completed a comprehensive review of the Coastal Resources Commission’s rules and policies, along with the division’s procedures for processing and making decisions on Coastal Area Management Act permits. This review resulted in suggested changes in six key areas that would help reduce regulatory burdens for our customers:

  • Streamlining CAMA general permits for docks and piers by increasing the number of vessels allowed under a general permit for small-scale docking facilities from two to four;

  • Streamlining general permits for boat ramps in order to simplify permitting for applicants and reduce costs;

  • Streamlining permits for inlet dredging activities;

  • Reducing the regulatory burden related to beach fill projects, by reducing sampling requirements for certain types of beach fill projects and clarifying minimum standards for sediment compatibility and project monitoring;

  • Streamlining public notice and adjacent property owner notification requirements; and

  • Expanding the general permit for wetland, stream and buffer mitigation to cover projects undertaken by private sector organizations.

DCM will work with the CRC to move forward with these suggested changes during 2013.

For more information, contact Ted Tyndall atTed.Tyndall@ncdenr.gov.

DCM Water Monitoring Station Sheds Light on Cause of Fish Kill
Last month, hundreds of thousands of dead Atlantic Menhaden washed ashore at the Masonboro Island National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) in Wilmington. The fish did not appear to be diseased or sick, so what happened to them?

A monitoring station maintained by the Coastal Reserve in the area where the fish were found helped provide the answer. 

As part of a national network of estuary monitoring stations (NERR System-wide Monitoring Program), DCM maintains a monitoring station in the area where the fish kill occurred. The station continuously monitors the water for dissolved oxygen levels, temperature and pH levels, among other data. The station recorded a significant drop in dissolved oxygen levels in the early morning hours of Jan. 8.

Based on the station’s data, it appears the fish clustered by the thousands in a narrow area at Loosins Creek, causing dissolved oxygen levels in the water to plummet to nearly zero in less than one hour, killing the fish. This situation has been occasionally observed in winter months, and occurs when the menhaden begin to tighten their school, possibly due to the presence of predators.

“This may be the first time we have had continuous monitoring of water quality in an area at the exact time of a fish kill,” said Jim Gregson, Surface Water Protection supervisor for the state Division of Water Quality. “The data recorded by Coastal Management’s monitoring station was a big help in determining the cause of this event.”

For more information, contact Byron Toothman atToothmanb@uncw.edu.

New Oceanfront Erosion Rates Effective Feb. 1
Updated long-term average annual erosion rates for North Carolina’s oceanfront have been approved by the Coastal Resources Commission and became effective Feb. 1, 2013.

A long-term average annual erosion rate is the average amount of erosion that occurs each year over a period of about 50 years. By measuring movement of the ocean shoreline over a long period of time, the Division of Coastal Management is able to get a more accurate representation of the net shoreline change, taking into account normal shoreline movement, beach nourishment and storms.

DCM uses long-term average annual erosion rates in determining setback distances for oceanfront construction. Setbacks are measured from the first line of stable natural vegetation, or static vegetation line where applicable.

The newly adopted erosion rates are not substantially different from the rates adopted in 2003, as most of the oceanfront shoreline demonstrated very little change when compared to results from the previous study. From a regulatory standpoint, the new erosion rates, or setback factors, did not change for 64 percent of the shoreline.

For more information, contact Ken Richardson atKen.Richardson@ncdenr.gov.

Sandbag Rules Move Forward
The Coastal Resources Commission in February approved amendments to its rules governing the use of sandbag structures in communities that are actively pursuing beach nourishment, inlet relocation or inlet stabilization projects. The rule changes would extend the time limit for sandbag structures from five to eight years, and would also remove the once-per-structure restriction for sandbags provided the property becomes imminently threatened again.

The rule amendments must be approved by the state’s Rules Review Commission before they become effective.

Join the Coastal Reserve for Summer Science School
The N.C. Coastal Reserve is partnering with the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort to offer Summer Science School for children. The following programs will be sponsored by the N.C. Coastal Reserve:

Preschool Story Time & Crafts (Free, registration required)
Monday, June 10, 9 – 10 a.m.
Monday, July 8, 9 – 10 a.m.
Monday, August 5, 9 – 10 a.m.

Seashore Life ($50)
Monday & Tuesday, June 17 & 18, 9 a.m. – noon
Monday & Tuesday, July 15 & 16, 9 a.m. – noon
Thursday & Friday, August 1 & 2, 9 a.m. – noon

For more detailed information about all the programs offered, or to register, download theSummer Science School brochure, or contact education coordinator Lori Davis atlori.davis@ncdenr.gov.

Staff Kudos
In each newsletter we like to highlight recent kudos for our staff. Kelly Russell, field representative in DCM’s Elizabeth City office, recently received this comment in an email from a local homeowner:

“And a special ‘thank you’ for all your efforts and those of your Supervisors in assisting the Buxton oceanfront homeowners with post-Sandy restorations.”

DCM’s attorney Christine Goebel received a compliment from a petitioner in a recent variance case:

“Thanks for your support again helping me to understand the rules along the way.  Was quite helpful...”

Coastal Training Coordinator Whitney Jenkins received this email from a frequent workshop attendee:

“I appreciate how wonderful your seminars are.  I wished I could have made the last one in Jacksonville at Sturgeon City (New River Roundtable Collaborative Learning Training, October 18, 2012).  I heard it was awesome!“

DCM is always proud of our staff’s commitment to providing all of our customers with the very best in customer service.

Legislative Update
The following bills affecting Coastal Management have been introduced in the General Assembly:

SB 10 – Government Reorganization and Efficiency Act:  Makes changes to several state boards and commissions, including the Coastal Resources Commission and Coastal Resources Advisory Council. Ends the terms of current members of both the CRC and CRAC. The House version of this bill retains four current CRC members until June 30, 2014. Reduces the CRC from 15 members to 13 (House version; Senate version reduces CRC from 15 to 11), and alters requirements for commissioners. CRC appointments, now all made by the governor, would change to some appointed by the governor and some by the General Assembly. Reduces the CRAC from 45 to 20 members. Eliminates CRAC agency appointments currently made by state department heads and others, and gives that authority to the Coastal Resources Commission. The House passed its version of the bill on March 5. The Senate did not concur with the House changes. The bill will now go to conference committee.

SB 32/HB 74 – Periodic Review and Expiration of Rules:  Expires all environmental rules, including those of the CRC, unless the rules are readopted before Dec. 31, 2017, or within 10 years of a rule’s most recent amendment.

SB 58 – Increase Funding for Dredging:  Establishes the Shallow Draft Inlet Dredging Fund, generated from increased fees for boat registration.

SB 76 – Domestic Energy Jobs Act: Makes several changes to the 2012 law opening the state to shale-gas drilling and encourages offshore drilling exploration.

SB 151 – Coastal Policy Reform Act of 2013:Section 4 gives local governments authority to enforce public trust rights on ocean beaches seaward of the mean high water mark.

Legal Update of Active Cases

Cases in the North Carolina Court of Appeals:

The Riggings HOA v. CRC(New Hanover 09 CVS 2761) - Judicial review of the CRC’s denial of a variance on re-hearing to allow expired sandbags to remain with no definite end date.

Busik v. CRC and 1118 Longwood(Brunswick 11 CVS 2596) - CRC’s Final Agency Decision regarding the interpretation of the ocean erosion setback rule (15A NCAC 7H .0306).

Cases in Wake County Superior Court:
Defenders of Wildlife & NWRA v. CRC (12 CVS 16364) – Appeal by Petitioners of the CRC Chairman’s denial of their request for a hearing in OAH to challenge the Bonner Bridge Replacement CAMA Permit, pursuant to 113A-121.1.

NCDCM CAMAgram, 1st Quarter 2013

Director's Note:
As the new year unfolds, Coastal Management and the Coastal Resources Commission are hard at work on several initiatives, including three studies that are required by Session Law 2012-202 -- an update to a 2010 report on sea-level rise; a study of the feasibility of creating a new Area of Environmental Concern for lands adjacent to the mouth of the Cape Fear River; and a study of the feasibility of eliminating beachfront Inlet Hazard Areas of Environmental Concern. We have engaged the Commission’s Science Panel on Coastal Hazards to begin work on the Inlet Hazard Area and sea-level rise studies, with the goal of providing final reports to the General Assembly in 2015 and 2016, respectively.

In addition, the division recently completed a comprehensive, internal review of coastal management rules and policies. We have suggested changes in six key areas that should help streamline some of our permits and processes, and hopefully make things easier for our customers while maintaining riparian property rights, public trust rights, and environmental integrity. Draft rule changes will be presented to the Commission at its next meeting.

We are also seeing an increasing trend in coastal permit applications, with development activity picking up coastwide. We hope that this trend will continue, and we look forward to another busy and productive year at the Division of Coastal Management!

Please feel free to share this newsletter with colleagues and friends, and let us know if you have any suggestions for future newsletters. If you would like to have your name added or removed from the email list, please email your request toMichele.Walker@ncdenr.gov. Additional coastal program information can also be found on our web site,http://www.nccoastalmanagement.net.

Braxton Davis, Director, NC Division of Coastal Management

In this Issue:

  • DCM Rules Review Yields Proposals for Rule Changes in 2013

  • DCM Water Monitoring Station Sheds Light on Cause of Fish Kill

  • New Oceanfront Erosion Rates Effective Feb. 1

  • Sandbag Rules Move Forward

  • Join the Coastal Reserve for Summer Science School

  • Staff Kudos

  • Legislative Update

  • Legal Update

DCM Rules Review Yields Proposals for Rule Changes in 2013
The Division of Coastal Management recently completed a comprehensive review of the Coastal Resources Commission’s rules and policies, along with the division’s procedures for processing and making decisions on Coastal Area Management Act permits. This review resulted in suggested changes in six key areas that would help reduce regulatory burdens for our customers:

  • Streamlining CAMA general permits for docks and piers by increasing the number of vessels allowed under a general permit for small-scale docking facilities from two to four;

  • Streamlining general permits for boat ramps in order to simplify permitting for applicants and reduce costs;

  • Streamlining permits for inlet dredging activities;

  • Reducing the regulatory burden related to beach fill projects, by reducing sampling requirements for certain types of beach fill projects and clarifying minimum standards for sediment compatibility and project monitoring;

  • Streamlining public notice and adjacent property owner notification requirements; and

  • Expanding the general permit for wetland, stream and buffer mitigation to cover projects undertaken by private sector organizations.

DCM will work with the CRC to move forward with these suggested changes during 2013.

For more information, contact Ted Tyndall atTed.Tyndall@ncdenr.gov.

DCM Water Monitoring Station Sheds Light on Cause of Fish Kill
Last month, hundreds of thousands of dead Atlantic Menhaden washed ashore at the Masonboro Island National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) in Wilmington. The fish did not appear to be diseased or sick, so what happened to them?

A monitoring station maintained by the Coastal Reserve in the area where the fish were found helped provide the answer. 

As part of a national network of estuary monitoring stations (NERR System-wide Monitoring Program), DCM maintains a monitoring station in the area where the fish kill occurred. The station continuously monitors the water for dissolved oxygen levels, temperature and pH levels, among other data. The station recorded a significant drop in dissolved oxygen levels in the early morning hours of Jan. 8.

Based on the station’s data, it appears the fish clustered by the thousands in a narrow area at Loosins Creek, causing dissolved oxygen levels in the water to plummet to nearly zero in less than one hour, killing the fish. This situation has been occasionally observed in winter months, and occurs when the menhaden begin to tighten their school, possibly due to the presence of predators.

“This may be the first time we have had continuous monitoring of water quality in an area at the exact time of a fish kill,” said Jim Gregson, Surface Water Protection supervisor for the state Division of Water Quality. “The data recorded by Coastal Management’s monitoring station was a big help in determining the cause of this event.”

For more information, contact Byron Toothman atToothmanb@uncw.edu.

New Oceanfront Erosion Rates Effective Feb. 1
Updated long-term average annual erosion rates for North Carolina’s oceanfront have been approved by the Coastal Resources Commission and became effective Feb. 1, 2013.

A long-term average annual erosion rate is the average amount of erosion that occurs each year over a period of about 50 years. By measuring movement of the ocean shoreline over a long period of time, the Division of Coastal Management is able to get a more accurate representation of the net shoreline change, taking into account normal shoreline movement, beach nourishment and storms.

DCM uses long-term average annual erosion rates in determining setback distances for oceanfront construction. Setbacks are measured from the first line of stable natural vegetation, or static vegetation line where applicable.

The newly adopted erosion rates are not substantially different from the rates adopted in 2003, as most of the oceanfront shoreline demonstrated very little change when compared to results from the previous study. From a regulatory standpoint, the new erosion rates, or setback factors, did not change for 64 percent of the shoreline.

For more information, contact Ken Richardson atKen.Richardson@ncdenr.gov.

Sandbag Rules Move Forward
The Coastal Resources Commission in February approved amendments to its rules governing the use of sandbag structures in communities that are actively pursuing beach nourishment, inlet relocation or inlet stabilization projects. The rule changes would extend the time limit for sandbag structures from five to eight years, and would also remove the once-per-structure restriction for sandbags provided the property becomes imminently threatened again.

The rule amendments must be approved by the state’s Rules Review Commission before they become effective.

Join the Coastal Reserve for Summer Science School
The N.C. Coastal Reserve is partnering with the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort to offer Summer Science School for children. The following programs will be sponsored by the N.C. Coastal Reserve:

Preschool Story Time & Crafts (Free, registration required)
Monday, June 10, 9 – 10 a.m.
Monday, July 8, 9 – 10 a.m.
Monday, August 5, 9 – 10 a.m.

Seashore Life ($50)
Monday & Tuesday, June 17 & 18, 9 a.m. – noon
Monday & Tuesday, July 15 & 16, 9 a.m. – noon
Thursday & Friday, August 1 & 2, 9 a.m. – noon

For more detailed information about all the programs offered, or to register, download theSummer Science School brochure, or contact education coordinator Lori Davis atlori.davis@ncdenr.gov.

Staff Kudos
In each newsletter we like to highlight recent kudos for our staff. Kelly Russell, field representative in DCM’s Elizabeth City office, recently received this comment in an email from a local homeowner:

“And a special ‘thank you’ for all your efforts and those of your Supervisors in assisting the Buxton oceanfront homeowners with post-Sandy restorations.”

DCM’s attorney Christine Goebel received a compliment from a petitioner in a recent variance case:

“Thanks for your support again helping me to understand the rules along the way.  Was quite helpful...”

Coastal Training Coordinator Whitney Jenkins received this email from a frequent workshop attendee:

“I appreciate how wonderful your seminars are.  I wished I could have made the last one in Jacksonville at Sturgeon City (New River Roundtable Collaborative Learning Training, October 18, 2012).  I heard it was awesome!“

DCM is always proud of our staff’s commitment to providing all of our customers with the very best in customer service.

Legislative Update
The following bills affecting Coastal Management have been introduced in the General Assembly:

SB 10 – Government Reorganization and Efficiency Act:  Makes changes to several state boards and commissions, including the Coastal Resources Commission and Coastal Resources Advisory Council. Ends the terms of current members of both the CRC and CRAC. The House version of this bill retains four current CRC members until June 30, 2014. Reduces the CRC from 15 members to 13 (House version; Senate version reduces CRC from 15 to 11), and alters requirements for commissioners. CRC appointments, now all made by the governor, would change to some appointed by the governor and some by the General Assembly. Reduces the CRAC from 45 to 20 members. Eliminates CRAC agency appointments currently made by state department heads and others, and gives that authority to the Coastal Resources Commission. The House passed its version of the bill on March 5. The Senate did not concur with the House changes. The bill will now go to conference committee.

SB 32/HB 74 – Periodic Review and Expiration of Rules:  Expires all environmental rules, including those of the CRC, unless the rules are readopted before Dec. 31, 2017, or within 10 years of a rule’s most recent amendment.

SB 58 – Increase Funding for Dredging:  Establishes the Shallow Draft Inlet Dredging Fund, generated from increased fees for boat registration.

SB 76 – Domestic Energy Jobs Act: Makes several changes to the 2012 law opening the state to shale-gas drilling and encourages offshore drilling exploration.

SB 151 – Coastal Policy Reform Act of 2013:Section 4 gives local governments authority to enforce public trust rights on ocean beaches seaward of the mean high water mark.

Legal Update of Active Cases

Cases in the North Carolina Court of Appeals:

The Riggings HOA v. CRC(New Hanover 09 CVS 2761) - Judicial review of the CRC’s denial of a variance on re-hearing to allow expired sandbags to remain with no definite end date.

Busik v. CRC and 1118 Longwood(Brunswick 11 CVS 2596) - CRC’s Final Agency Decision regarding the interpretation of the ocean erosion setback rule (15A NCAC 7H .0306).

Cases in Wake County Superior Court:
Defenders of Wildlife & NWRA v. CRC (12 CVS 16364) – Appeal by Petitioners of the CRC Chairman’s denial of their request for a hearing in OAH to challenge the Bonner Bridge Replacement CAMA Permit, pursuant to 113A-121.1.

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