skip to main content | skip to footer
N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources

NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Albemarle-Pamlico National Estuary Partnership - Past Restoration Projects

Albemarle-Pamlico National Estuary Partnership

Past Restoration Projects

restoration project in progress

 

The projects listed below represent most of APNEP's conservation and restoration initiatives since 2002.  Many constructed wetland projects have also served educational purposes for K-12 students and communities throughout the APNEP region.  These projects were undertaken in concert with APNEP's program parters and by recipients of APNEP's grants. APNEP is currently developing a comprehensive and searchable database of all APNEP-supported initiatives that have taken place since the founding of the program.  This database is expected to be available in 2013.

Project Title Year
Hydrologic restoration at Dismal Swamp and Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge 2012
Tidal creek oyster restoration using crab pots 2012
Jockey's Ridge Shoreline Restoration 2012
J.H. Rose High School In-Stream Constructed Wetlands 2010
Uriah Branch Nature Trail  2010
Landscaping with Nature in Currituck County 2010
Reducing Stormwater into Bogue Sound at the DMF Headquarters 2010
Carrot Island Habitat Improvement Demonstration Project 2010
Edward W. Wyatt Middle School Nature’s Classroom and Exploratory Trail  2010
East Wake Academy Watershed & Wetlands Outdoor Classroom & Boardwalk  2010
Reducing Stormwater Runoff into Core Sound at the CLNS Visitor Center, Harkers Island, NC 2010
Fishing Creek (EEP)  2010
Elizabeth City Eco-Park 2010
Renewable Energy Discovery Zone 2009
Rainwater Harvesting System Demonstration 2009
Wet and Wild Detention Pond – P.S. Jones Middle School 2007
Williamston High School Low Impact Development Project 2007
Buckridge Coastal Reserve Tide Gate 2007
Red Hill Elementary Riparian Buffer Demonstration 2007
Washington Montessori Charter School Bio-Swale Demonstration Project 2006
NC Coastal Federation Student Wetland Nursery Program 2006
J.E.J. Moore Middle School Nature Trail and Outdoor Classroom 2006
North Hampton Outdoor Learning Center and Nature Trail 2006
Holmes High School Storm Water Reduction through Underground Drainage Systems 2006
Carteret Community College Shoreline Restoration Project 2006
Perquimans County High School Constructed Wetland and Environmental Education Project 2006
Manteo Middle School Stormwater Treatment and Outdoor Education Project 2006
Hoop Pole Creek Water Quality and Habitat Restoration Project 2005
Stevens Nature Center – Celebration of Nature 2005
Greene County Water Reuse/Rainwater Harvesting Project 2005
Wayne County Water Reuse/Rainwater Harvesting Project 2005
Town of Gatesville Water Quality Demonstration Project 2005
Protecting Water Quality by Using Bridgemat Crossings on Forestry Options 2005
Pactolus Elementary School Stormwater Wetland, Pitt County 2004
Virginia Watersheds SWAMP Assistance 2004
North River Oyster Reef Restoration 2004
Citizens’ Oyster Gardening Program for North Carolina 2004
North Carolina and Virginia Oil Recycling Project 2004
Bunn High School Bio-retention Area Demonstration Project 2004
North Carolina Aquarium Landscape Runoff and Water Quality Demonstration Project 2004
FerryMon 2003
Conservation Easement Workshops 2003
Tryon Palace Wetlands Reconstruction 2002

 

Detailed Project Information

 

CAC Project: J.H. Rose High School In-Stream Constructed Wetlands

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $19,800

Total Cost of Project: $253,352.76

On a previously unusable piece of land, J.H. Rose High School built an area of in-stream constructed wetlands on their campus to help improve water quality in the area and better manage stormwater runoff. Students in various environmental science curricula at the high school were involved in a variety of hands-on activities during the construction of this riparian buffer by assisting with projects such as planting hydrophytic vegetative species and constructing a wooden boardwalk. Additionally, future students and members of the community will also utilize this project in outdoor curriculum on the boardwalk, and by partaking in other outreach efforts. 

Without J.H. Rose High School’s wetland, 65-acres of urban watershed stormwater flow directly into the Greens Mill Run urban stream and subsequently into the Tar River. The hydrophytic vegetation and many biotic and abiotic processes of the in-stream constructed wetlands will help with erosion control, removing contaminants in stormwater, and reduced sediment deposit in the river. Creation of this wetland also provides shelter, spawning, and feeding habitat for both aquatic and terrestrial species. Not only does the project provide students with an outdoor classroom, but it also improves water quality, provides some habitat rehabilitation, and creates a safer and more aesthetically pleasing campus.

J.H. Rose High School partnered with Mattamuskeet Management & Consulting, Pitt SWCD, Pitt County Schools, Baldwin & Janowski, P.A., E.R. Lewis Construction Co., Hopf & Higley, P.A., NCDENR, East Carolina University, J.H. Rose High School administration, J.H. Rose Athletic Booster Foundation, and Mid-East RC&D Council, Inc. in their In-Stream Constructed Wetlands Schoolyard Demonstration Project. 

Project Administrator: 

J. David Hodges, Jr., Coordinator

Mid-East RC&D Council, Inc.

403 Government Circle, Suite 5

Greenville, NC 27834

(252) 830-6375

mideastrcd@coastalnet.com 

 

CAC Project: Uriah Branch Nature Trail 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $19,159.46

Total Cost of Project: $20,739.65

Construction of the Uriah Branch Nature Trail will provide the community with a 3,420 ft. long walking trail along the Uriah Branch Stream in Greensville County. With the help of scientists from the Chowan Basin Soil and Water Conservation District and USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service, placards and brochures identifying plants, soil types, aquatic life, animals and other aspects of the natural community will also assist with education and outreach for the public and students in summer camps. 

Greensville County as partnered with Chowan Basin Soil and Water Conservation District, USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service, the Greensville County Extension Office and their 4-H Program, Boy Scouts of America, and the Southside Regional Jail in construction of Phase I of the Uriah Branch Trail. Through the completion of Phase I and eventually the complete Uriah Branch Nature Trail, the trail will assist in educating the public about their watershed, the negative effects pollution have in the ecosystem and thus environmental stewardship and the need to maintain a healthy watershed. 

Project Administrator: 

Linwood E. Pope, Jr., Director of Planning

County of Greensville 

1781 Greensville County Circle

Emporia, VA 23847

(434) 348-4232

lpope@greensvillecountyva.gov  

 

CAC Project: Landscaping with Nature in Currituck County 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $20,000

Total Cost of Project: $44,629

The Landscaping with Nature in Currituck County aims to demonstrate to the public how to incorporate native plants and maintain natural landscape features on any piece of land. While this demonstration project of the “Currituck Goes Green Initiative” will take place on county-owned land, the coordinators hope to show how to implement stormwater control and treatment systems, as well as incorporating native plants into landscaping. Stormwater control, treatment systems, and native plants are all very important wetland features.  

Steps to accomplish this goal include improving stormwater treatment by redesigning stormwater detention ponds in Currituck County, building small gardens made of native-plants near these ponds, and actively working to educate key audiences in the county about the need and benefits of planting native plants and working with the natural landscape. Such efforts will be the first in the Currituck Goes Green Initiative that utilize an on-the-ground approach at demonstrating to the public how “green” practices will benefit the environment. 

From its start in 2008 and to this day, the Currituck Goes Green Initiative has partnered with the following groups and departments to help them promote “green” practices: NC Sea Grant, Coastal Studies Institute, the NC Coastal Federation, NC State University, East Carolina University, and local realtors and bankers. 

Project Administrator: 

Gloria Putnam, Water Quality Planning Specialist 

North Carolina Sea Grant

NC State University

Flex Lab Building, Module 1

1575 Varsity Drive

Raleigh, NC 27695

(919) 513-0117

gloria_putnam@ncsu.edu 

 

CAC Project: Reducing Stormwater into Bogue Sound at the DMF Headquarters 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $8,087

Total Cost of Project: $14,557

The North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries is partnering with the North Carolina Coastal Federation on a project that will restore a portion of the shoreline at the NCDMF headquarters in Morehead City. Their plan of action is to re-vegetate a portion of Bogue Sound to help mitigate the detrimental effects stormwater runoff has on North Carolina’s shellfish populations. 

Planning, funding, and engineering this project has been an effort amongst NCDMF, NCCF and UNC Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences, funding through the Clean Water Management Trust Fund, and engineering with Withers & Ravenel. The outline project objectives are to create a valuable marsh habitat that will infiltrate polluted runoff and reduce shoreline erosion, provide an opportunity for community education and participation, and provide a demonstration project for NCDMF staff to use in distributing information to developers about methods which effectively reduce stormwater inputs into Bogue Sound. 

Studying the effect re-vegetation of the shoreline has in reducing the stormwater runoff on fragile shellfish habitats and other fisheries will help NCDMF and its partners better understand and implement regulations and suggestions describing the least harmful development practices along Bogue Sound. Information on the importance of managing runoff will be used and distributed to students, community members, and developers through a variety of presentations. 

Project Administrator: 

Dr. Michelle Duval, Executive Assistant for Councils

NC Division of Marine Fisheries

PO Box 769

Morehead City, NC 28557

(252) 808-8011

michelle.duval@ncdenr.gov 

 

CAC Project: Carrot Island Habitat Improvement Demonstration Project

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $14,929

Total Cost of Project: $29,077.80

The N.C. Coastal Reserve and National Estuarine Research Reserve (Reserve), both part of the N.C. Division of Coastal Management, are working with the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores to improve a dredge spoil habitat located on the Rachel Carson component of the Reserve. The partners highlight the problems with dredge spoil deposit indicating it creates bare substrates which eventually lead to the replacement of natural plant communities. Subsequently, the trampling and grazing by feral horses disrupts natural plant colonization processes, leads to erosion and slows soil stabilization. 

The project outlines a set of steps they will use to improve Carrot Island’s natural plant community. The partners will plant native seaside little bluestem and saltmeadow hay to stabilize sediment and increase biodiversity, and construct a perimeter fence to reduce the damaging effects of feral horses. They will also educate the public through involvement and outreach about the effects of non-native species and inform them of the need for habitat improvement. Lastly, the partners will use this information to inform management decisions about habitat improvement at coastal sites that receive dredge spoil. 

The project collaborators are also working with Newport Elementary School, the Aquarium Horticulturalist, the Rachel Carson Site Manager, and the Town of Beaufort to implement this project. 

Project Administrator: 

Paula Gillikin, Rachel Carson Site Manager 

N.C. Division of Coastal Management 

 N.C.  Coastal Reserve and National Estuarine Research Reserve

101 Pivers Island Road

Beaufort, NC 28516

(252) 838-0886

paula.gillikin@ncdenr.gov 

 

Edward W. Wyatt Middle School Nature’s Classroom and Exploratory Trail 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $12,000

Total Cost of Project: $16,287

Edward W. Wyatt Middle School in the Chowan River Basin, is constructing a Nature Classroom and Exploratory Trail on an area of their campus. Their Nature Classroom will consist of an outdoor pavilion that contains a teaching area and enough seating for a class of 35 students. Additionally, the Nature Classroom portion of this project will continue beyond the pavilion area and into a dry riverbed which will be constructed from an existing gully. A nature exploratory trail will be built, and interpretive signs created and placed along the trail to continue the outdoor education aspect of the project. 

Wyatt Middle School is working with Chowan Basin Soil and Water Conservation District, Virginia Department of Forestry, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, South Centre’ Corridors Resource Conservation and Development Council, as well as Boy Scouts and other county and city volunteers to complete this project. The middle school plans to use this project as a way to increase public awareness and involvement in the issues surrounding watersheds and estuaries, provide an area for environmental training and education for students, teachers, or the general public, promote stewardship, and protect vital wildlife. 

Project Administrator: 

Teresa Lindberg, Agriscience Teacher 

Edward W. Wyatt Middle School

206 Slagle’s Lake Road

Emporia, VA 23847

(434) 634-5159

 

East Wake Academy Watershed & Wetlands Outdoor Classroom & Boardwalk 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $12,000

Total Cost of Project: $27,500

The East Wake Academy Watershed and Wetlands Outdoor Classroom and Boardwalk will maintain or enhance water quality, conserve and protect vital fish and wildlife habitats, and enhance local fisheries. The school will install wildlife and plant information signage, a rain garden to serve as a storm water management system, and a boardwalk extension of an existing trail. 

The Academy plans to construct a boardwalk in order to minimize harm to the plants already along the nature trail, and to limit the amount of land being cleared. Students will study the wetland area that runs along the path of the nature trail and boardwalk. By removing trash and maintaining water quality, the new signage installed with this project can also help inform the public of how the water quality and health of the creek affect the local pooled fishing area of Little Creek. The Academy wants the school and students in all grades to partner with the Town of Zebulon in maintaining the area, identifying invasive species, assisting in trash removal, and providing a storm water enhancement and outdoor classroom area. 

Project Administrator: 

Paul Davis

East Wake Academy

400 NMC Drive

Zebulon, NC 27597

(919) 404-0444

ewapaul@bellsouth.net  

 

Reducing Stormwater Runoff into Core Sound at the CLNS Visitor Center, Harkers Island, NC 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $10,200

Total Cost of Project: $20,402

The North Carolina Coastal Federation is designing a stormwater runoff reduction project which they will complete with 40 students from the Harkers Island Elementary School, two teachers and community volunteers. The partners will work on a bio-retention or infiltration area to capture and contain the polluted stormwater runoff flowing from the parking lot and road at the Cape Lookout Visitors Center. Currently, without the bio-retention area, polluted stormwater runoff runs directly into a rich primary nursery area of Core Sound. 

The bio-retention area will be made up of a natural riparian buffer with upper marsh vegetation instead of the current asphalt in the area. The planting of smooth cordgrass and saltmeadow hay along the shoreline will also serve in the bio-retention and rain garden areas. 

This project will teach students about environmental stewardship, how to conduct pre- and post-project monitoring of the area and will also assist in educating the public on stormwater pollution and best management practices. This demonstration project will provide students and the community with a high-visibility project and an excellent hands-on learning approach to water quality and water quality improvement. NCCF will also work with the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and National Park Service to assist with the project’s signage and outreach components. 

Project Administrator: 

Dr. Lexia Weaver, NCCF Coastal Scientist 

3609 Highway 24 (Ocean)

Newport, NC 28570

(252) 393-8185

lexiaw@nccoast.org 

 

Fishing Creek (EEP) 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $14,000

Total Cost of Project: $14,000-$28,000

The NCEEP has worked on developing a Local Watershed Plan (LWP) for Fishing Creek. Fishing Creek is located in the upper Tar River drainage system and listed on the state’s list of impaired waters. To improve the water quality of this creek, stakeholders defined a list of project recommendations for the watershed. The Fishing Creek EEP project will fund a Watershed Coordinator position to implement the projects laid out by the stakeholders. 

The goals of having a Watershed coordinator are to have someone that will effectively oversee the projects designed to improve water quality which includes habitat and hydrology. This is done by reducing nutrient, chemical and sediment inputs into the stream. They will also manage Vital Habitats projects aimed at improving the stream quality to support rare mussels and to improve their habitats, and to promote stewardship and preservation opportunities along Fishing Creek. The coordinator will be required to meet with stakeholders, contact landowners along the creek, prepare funding requests, coordinate and manage project work, and communicate with a variety of governments and local departments. 

Project Administrator: 

Karen Canavaciol, Office Assistant 

Albemarle-Pamlico National Estuary Program

1601 Mail Service Center

Raleigh, NC 27699

(919) 715-4113

Karen.canavaciol@ncmail.net 

 

Research and Restoration: East Carolina University  

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $58,440

Professors Dr. Corbett and Dr. Walsh at East Carolina University have proposed a project that will study the specific effects sea-level rise and storms have on the landscape and its ecosystems. Through their research, they hope to determine how the landscape responds to resulting sea-level rise events such as flooding, accelerated erosion, and loss of wetlands. More specifically, the researchers are interested in studying the effects of sea-level rise on shoreline and shore zone changes in the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine System (APES). 

The researchers are studying the dynamics of wetland erosion to attempt to determine the eventual distribution, fate and management of these vital habitats in the APES. Their research will address the following questions: 1) Can we predict the rates of wetland loss across the APES based on previous research? 2) Do major hurricanes appear to be causing wetland losses? How do “event” and “hurricane-period” rates of erosion compare to erosion rates measured over longer timescales? 3) And, based on field observations, what events and key processes (ex: waves) appear to be driving observed wetland losses?  

By selecting 11 research sites and recording the starting conditions, the scientists will determine rates of wetland loss, erosion, and shoreline changes. They will also monitor wave data and sediment transport to calibrate a wave model for the region. The data obtained will then be compiled into websites, Google maps, and educational posters to communicate management possibilities and information regarding the rate of change in the physical features of the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine System.  Such information will be vital in maintaining the health and function of the coastal ecosystem, especially as sea-level rise and potentially increased storm incidences occur. 

Project Administrator: 

Dr. Reide Corbett and Dr. J.P. Walsh

Department of Geological Sciences & Institute for Coastal Science and Policy

East Carolina University 

101 Graham Building

Greenville, NC 27858

(252) 328-6360

corbettd@ecu.edu and walshj@ecu.edu 

 

Research and Restoration: University of North Carolina  

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $67,364

Total Cost of Project: $115,773.04

Dr. Niels Lindquist’s Research and Restoration Project titled “Evaluating Restoration Success for Newly Constructed Oyster Reefs Spanning a Critical Intertidal Elevation” will study and monitor constructed oyster shell reefs at three different intertidal elevations. Oyster reefs serve a variety of critical purposes as ecosystem engineers that enhance the clarity and quality of water, provide habitats for important crustaceans and finfish, and stabilize shorelines against storm damage and erosion. In addition to their role as ecosystem engineers, oyster reefs are also constructed to restore and create suitable oyster settlement substrates in various estuarine locations to support the oyster population. However, due to a variety of physical and biological processes (mechanical harvest, storms, boat wakes) oyster reefs are not always successful. 

This Research and Restoration project will monitor oyster reefs in intertidal waters in order to design restoration practices that maximize oyster recruitment and minimize any destructive incidents such as disease or parasite infections. Determining the critical level (below which biofouling and sponge infestation occur) will help maximize reef health and maintenance. The study will measure and monitor oyster reefs at three different intertidal elevations based on biotic surveys, reef size, and community structure. The data obtained from these studies will assist in understanding oyster reefs’ ecosystem services and habitat values in intertidal settings, as well as aiding in the development of best restoration models. Understanding these components could lead to improved oyster, crustacean, and finfish populations vital in the fishery industries, as well as improving species diversity and expanding species’ habitats in the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine System. 

The project will allow many student technicians to gain hands-on experience in the natural sciences, and outreach displays and presentations will be set up at the North Carolina Coastal Reserve and National Estuarine Research Office. 

Project Administrator: 

Dr. Niels L. Lindquist, Professor 

Institute of Marine Sciences

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

3431 Arendell Street

Morehead City, NC 28557

(252) 726-6841 ext. 136

nlindquist@unc.edu  

 

Research and Restoration: Appalachian State University  

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $64,009

Total Cost of Project: $113,300

Dr. Michael Gangloff of Appalachian State University is working on a project called “Assessment of Small Dam Impacts on Freshwater Mussels and Fishes in the Tar, Roanoke, Neuse and Chowan River Drainages, North Carolina and Virginia”. In the Albemarle-Pamlico Basin (APB), there are many more low-head dams, meaning those that are less than 5m in height, than there are hydroelectric dams and thus may have a significantly greater impact. Research surprisingly shows that low-head dams may actually benefit native mussel species due to various habitat components like sediment accumulation and other fish populations. 

Dr. Gangloff’s project aims to understand how exactly small dams are affecting the aquatic resources in the APB to better implement and prioritize habitat conservation and restoration projects, especially for at-risk freshwater fish and mussels. The goals of his study are to quantify effects of small dams on mollusk and fish populations, and stream habitats across the APB, provide baseline estimates of mollusk and fish populations near small dams, and provide resource managers with an empirical ranking system for evaluating and prioritizing dams for removal in the APB. By gathering this census data on freshwater fish and mussels, as well as understanding the effects of dams on these populations, more efficient conservation practices and programs can be developed and put into use. 

Project Administrator: 

Dr. Michael Gangloff, Research Assistant Professor 

Appalachian State University

Biology Department, Rankin Life Sciences

572 Rivers Street

Boone, NC 28608-2027

(828) 262-7790

gangloffmm@appstate.edu  

 

Research and Restoration: Albemarle Resource Conservation and Development Council, Inc. 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $49,000

Total Cost of Project: $59,000

The Albemarle Resource Conservation and Development Council, Inc. is designing a Research and Restoration project at Manteo High School titled the “Manteo High School Constructed Wetland and Outdoor Environmental Education Classroom”. The project will consist of constructing and planting a wetland between the high school and Dough’ s Creek, constructing a boardwalk over the wetland to Dough’s Creek, and developing environmental education curriculum for high school students. The wetland will serve as an outdoor classroom, and the boardwalk will facilitate observation, water quality sampling, and environmental education for the high school students. 

Construction of the wetland will take place at a key stormwater outfall and will subsequently improve the water quality of Dough’s Creek. Two other objectives of the project are to provide environmental education to the public and a learning environment for Manteo High School students and faculty. The boardwalk and wetland will help students and the community better understand the natural environments and the cause-and-effect relationship development and stormwater runoff have on natural systems. 

The Albemarle Resource Conservation and Development Council, Inc. is partnering with the UNC Coastal Studies Institute, Manteo High School science teachers and students, The Natural Resources Conservation Service, Dare Soil and Water Conservation District, and students from the UNC Institute for the Environment. 

Project Administrator: 

Linda Peterson, Program Manager 

Albemarle RC&D Council, Inc.

730 N. Granville Street, Suite B

Edenton, NC 27932

(252) 482-7437 ext. 4

linda.a.peterson@nc.nacdnet.net 

 

Research and Restoration: North Carolina Coastal Federation 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $99,967

Total Cost of Project: $183,484

The North Carolina Coastal Federation has designed a project in Hyde County called “Hydrologic Restoration for Habitat and Estuarine Water Quality Improvement”. To complete this project, NCCF formed partnerships with Mattamuskeet Ventures, Hyde County drainage district, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. The goal of the project is to provide vital habitat for migrating shorebirds and waterfowl on a key portion of the Atlantic Flyway, give wildlife needed habitat, give farmers access to water they can use for irrigation, and help protect fields from salty storm surge that could hinder or prevent crop production. 

More specifically, the project will consist of a 600-acre tract of land that is being restored for migrating shorebirds and water quality enhancement. The project will redirect and retain agricultural runoff on land under a permanent Wetland Reserve Program conservation easement, and run-off water in the existing canals will be pumped to alternate locations. Such measures are being installed to prevent any further runoff from entering the ICWW or the Pamlico Sound from the project area. Additionally, the project will have a water management plan that will work in accordance with management outlines for shorebirds and waterfowl and managing agricultural runoff to keep sediment, bacteria, and nutrients from running into primary or secondary nurseries. Installing 2.8 acres of vegetation and seven water control structures will create wetland marsh habitat for plant, terrestrial and aquatic species, as well as restoring hydrology. Ultimately, the project will improve water quality in certain estuarine areas, targeted for restoration, and create much-needed habitat in the Albemarle Pamlico Peninsula. 

Project Administrator: 

Todd Miller, Executive Director 

North Carolina Coastal Federation

3609 Highway 24 (Ocean)

Newport, NC 28570

(252) 393-8185

toddm@nccoast.org 

 

Research and Restoration: The Nature Conservancy

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $65,538

Total Cost of Project: $216,167

The Nature Conservancy of North Carolina is planning a project called “Building ecosystem resilience to climate change and sea-level rise through restoration of an estuarine habitat complex”. The goal of the project is to use invasive species removal, re-establishment of wetland hydrology, and construction of a fringing oyster reef to restore the ecosystem function of the abandoned Point Peter waterfowl impoundment and the surrounding estuarine subtidal zone. These areas, which are part of the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, lie on the easternmost side of the Albemarle Pamlico Peninsula. The Refuge is an area that is threatened by climate change and more specifically, due to accelerated sea-level rise (SLR); thus, the aim of this project is to try to protect and preserve this fragile area. 

Their plans to restore the ecosystem function include increasing ecosystem resilience to accelerated sea-level rise, creating and improving habitat for native oysters and wetland vegetation, improving estuarine water quality, enhancing habitat suitability for estuarine biota, and increasing estuarine biodiversity. Specific project components are building a high relief fringing oyster reef to lessen wave energy and provide habitat for estuarine biota, restore habitat at the abandoned waterfowl impoundment, and eradicate various invasive species. This demonstration project will also serve as a way for the Nature Conservancy and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to test climate change adaptation strategies and their effectiveness at combating SLR in the ecosystems of the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.

Project Administrator: 

Dr. Brian Boutin, Albemarle Climate Change Adaptation Project Director 

The Nature Conservancy, NC Chapter

701 W Ocean Acres Drive

Kill Devil Hills, NC 27948

(252) 441-2525

bboutin@tnc.org 

 

Elizabeth City Eco-Park 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $25,000

The Eco Park located along Knobbs Creek tributary in Elizabeth City, NC will help improve watershed management along the creek, protect wildlife habitat, encourage economic development, as well as create environmental and recreational education opportunities for residents, tourists, and students. This ecologically diverse nature park will be located on undeveloped flood lands in order to continue utilizing the lands. The lands will also contain wetland restoration techniques including watershed improvement projects such as stream, wetland, and riparian buffer restoration and enhancement, nature trails and ADA accessible paths (with information booths and interpretive signs) through the woods to flora and fauna viewing points, and a fish hatchery for a recreation fishing venue for local youth. 

In addition to the educational and restoration components of the Eco-Park, the park will create a variety of employment opportunities including short and long term jobs for architects, engineers, surveyors, biologists, wetland specialists, and many more professionals. In the future, the Eco-Park could potentially house a permanent Environmental Education Center. 

To make this project possible, the City of Elizabeth City has partnered with many agencies. With the help of community members, Pasquotank County, Elizabeth City State University (ECSU), Albemarle Economic Development Corporation (AEDC), Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB), Elizabeth City Pasquotank Public Schools (ECPPS), College of Albemarle (COA), NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources, NC Division of Tourism, NC Fish and Wildlife, NC Office of Science and Technology, NC Division of Community Assistance, the Environmental Protection Agency, Housing and Urban Development, US Department of the Interior, US Department of Agriculture, National Park Service, and Fish and Wildlife, the Eco-Park will become an important part of Elizabeth City. 

Project Administrator: 

Richard C. Olson, City Manager 

City of Elizabeth City

PO Box 347

Elizabeth City, NC 27907-0347

(252) 337-6864

rolson@cityofec.com 

 

Washington Montessori Charter School Bio-Swale Demonstration Project

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $20,000

Total Cost of Project: $42,810

The Washington Montessori Charter School constructed a bio-filter (bio-swale) stormwater treatment system to address excess run off from their roof and gravel parking lot. The system was constructed to treat runoff from the 8,000 square foot building, and to be sufficient for future school building expansions. It consists of a layer of medium sand and peat with plants such as arrow arum, pickerelweed, yellow flag, blue flag, and bald cypress.

 This bio-filter functions to slow the flow of runoff allowing pollutants to settle into the soil and plants where they are neutralized through natural processes.  In this area, a bio-swale is the only way to treat stormwater runoff as they do not have access to a wastewater treatment system for runoff; this system is especially important in peak rain periods to prevent increased risks of river pollution. The site features an educational sign describing the benefits of bio-swale techniques to treat runoff and numerous other green-building and water saving designs.

Project Administrator: 

Jeff Tubaugh

Washington Montessori School Board of Trustees

500 Avon Centre

Washington, NC 27889

(252) 945-1383

North Hampton Outdoor Learning Center and Nature Trail

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $20,000

Total Cost of Project: $24,250

The Northampton Nature Trail provides students and the general public with an outdoor learning opportunity for environmental education.  The site includes a teaching shelter and a handicap accessible boardwalk/pier onto an island that exists at a natural pond on the trail site. The boardwalk also has a platform that will assist with a teaching station for water quality education. The restored and reseeded barrow area contains picnic tables to assist with education programs. The Outdoor Learning Center is adjacent to the county office complex and a short walking distance from a new K-5 elementary school site. 

The Outdoor Learning Center contains a variety of plants and animals including hardwood forests, reseeded loblolly pines, and wetland forests, as well as quail, many song birds, rabbits, fox, snakes, other various aquatic invertebrates, and many more species. This project will demonstrate responsible stewardship, protection, and conservation of a natural area in the Roanoke River Basin. 

The partners involved in developing this project included the Northampton Soil and Water Conservation District, Natural Resource and Conservation Service, the Northampton Center of the NC Cooperative Extension Service, the Northampton Rotary Club, and the NC Division of Forest Resources. 

For more information about the Northampton Extension Services, visit: http://northampton.ces.ncsu.edu/

Project Administrator: 

Rose W. Massey, County Extension Director

 Dorothy Vick, Finance Officer

Northampton County Government

Jackson, NC 27845

(252) 534-2711

NC Coastal Federation Student Wetland Nursery Program 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $13,210

Total Cost of Project: $5,000

APNEP partnered with the North Carolina Coastal Federation (NCCF) in the implementation of their Student Wetland Nursery Program.  Through this project, NCCF staff taught students about wetlands and “on the ground” restoration projects.  More than 70% of species listed as endangered, threatened, or of special concern in North Carolina depend on wetlands for survival. By taking part in workshops and actively restoring up to 2 acres of healthy wetland, students came to understand the importance of this endangered habitat along our coastlines. 

 Healthy wetlands and estuarine habitat provide direct benefits to migrating birds, shellfish, finfish, and ocean coastal fisheries.  Wetlands protect coastal water quality by absorbing rainfall, recharging groundwater and filtering pollutants out of runoff.  They also hold back floodwaters and lessen erosion, protecting property from hurricanes and storms.  This partnership enabled NCCF to educate a broader community on the issues surrounding wetlands. 

For more information about the North Carolina Coastal Federation, please visit: 

http://www.nccoast.org/

Project Administrator: 

Sarah Phillips

Education Coordinator/NCCF

3609 Hwy 24

Newport, NC 28570

(252) 393-8185

J.E.J. Moore Middle School Nature Trail and Outdoor Classroom

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $10,000

J.E.J. Moore Middle School is located in Prince George County in Southeast Virginia and lies within the Chowan River Basin. With the partnering efforts of the Prince George County School Board, the faculty and administration at J.E.J. Moore Middle School, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, the James River Soil and Water District, and funding from APNEP, and the community (parents, teachers, students, and Boy Scouts), the students created an outdoor education facility and a 30,000 foot long pedestrian nature trail within 30 acres of undeveloped land on the school property. 

Located on land with a large wooded area along with distinct types of wetlands, the nature trail and surrounding areas are home to a diverse number of plant and animal species. Not only do students of J.E.J. Moore Middle School benefit from a quality hands-on approach to environmental science by use of the trail and outdoor classroom, but the whole county benefits as well. The project has increased public awareness that the area is part of the Chowan River Watershed and Albemarle-Pamlico Estuary. Currently, conservation and science classes are using the trail and classroom for outdoor education.

Project Administrator: 

Holly Boyd, Teacher

Elizabeth Kirby, Instructional Aide

JEJ Moore Middle School

11455 Prince George Dr. 

Disputanta, VA 23842

(804) 733-2740

hboyd@pgs.k12.va.us  

Holmes High School Storm Water Reduction through Underground Drainage Systems

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $6,650

Stormwater management is a critical concern for school grounds in coastal North Carolina.  Stormwater runoff from Holmes High School was being piped to a local waterway that empties into Edenton Bay until support from APNEP allowed the school to undertake a stormwater reduction project to decrease water runoff volume and increase water quality at those sites.  The project involved students and educators helping to set up and monitor the sites.  

Water flow meters were installed at the two basins in the front lawn to measure the volume of ground water entering each basin, as well as selected water quality parameters.  Earth Science and Chemistry classes at Holmes High School are involved in measuring rainfall, volume flow rate, taking water samples from the drainage basins and running chemical tests on the water samples.  The demonstration projects are also being communicated to the public through information pamphlets that show results of each runoff inhibitor design. Implementation of this project has taught the high school students about detrimental impacts of stormwater runoff thereby increasing public awareness on the issue. 

Project Administrator: 

Stephen Karl, Science Teacher 

600 Woodard Street

Edenton, NC 27932

(252) 482-8426

skarl@ecps.k12.nc.us 

Carteret Community College Shoreline Restoration Project

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $20,978

Total Cost of Project: $28,548

The North Carolina Coastal Federation undertook a project to engage at risk youth in hands-on learning and community mentoring partnerships around the topic of wetlands, clean estuaries, and environmental stewardship.  The project resulted not only in the direct restoration of a shoreline fronting Bogue Sound at Carteret Community College, but also resulted in a deeper understanding about the area’s natural resources, the importance of environmental stewardship, mentoring, and the strength of community partnerships. The outcome of this project was the enhancement of water quality, vital habitats, and fisheries, while encouraging stewardship of environmental resources in the White Oak River Basin. 

Working partnerships between the North Carolina Coastal Federation (NCCF), Carteret Community College (CCC), APNEP, the Boys and Girls Club of America (BGC), and citizen volunteers, were essential to the project’s success.  The project involved over 40 Boys and Girls Club members and 10 community college students, who planted 9,500 plants, created permanent signs and an educational fact sheet, and resulted in a half-hour cable show, with APNEP director Bill Crowell, that was aired bi-weekly for two months in 2007.

Project Administrator: 

Todd Miller, Executive Director/NCCF

3609 Hwy 24 Ocean

Newport, NC 28570

(252) 393-8185

toddm@nccoast.org 

Perquimans County High School Constructed Wetland and Environmental Education Project

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $11,400

Total Cost of Project: $13,400

The Perquimans County High School constructed a pedestrian bridge, an outdoor education center, and restored a small section of Jennie’s Gut wetland on the school’s property. Jennie’s Gut is a man-made ditch approximately 1000 feet in length which enters into the Perquimans River. It was originally intended to provide drainage for farmland and residences in the area, but instead became a section of deteriorated wetlands. 

The goal of this project was to improve the water quality through a two-phase project funded in part by APNEP grants. Before receiving grants for this project, the ditch regularly flooded and posed a large water quality problem to the Town of Hertford. Perquimans County High School has reshaped and restored the wetland hydrology of a portion on Jenny’s Gut, as well as created a permanent outdoor education laboratory. Construction of the pedestrian bridge allows students, teachers, and the community appropriate access to the constructed wetland. 

Perquimans High School partnered with Perquimans County Schools teachers and administrators, Hertford’s Town Manager, Perquimans County Commissioners, Perquimans County Soil and Water Conservation District representatives, and the Albemarle Resource Conservation and Development Council. 

Project Administrator: 

Dwayne K. Stallings

Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Administration 

Perquimans County Schools – Central Office

PO Box 337

Hertford, NC 27944

(252) 426-3644

Manteo Middle School Stormwater Treatment and Outdoor Education Project

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $14,500

Total Cost of Project: $21,840

Manteo Middle School’s teachers, students, and volunteers planted rain gardens on campus at a location with two large, not previously landscaped, stormwater retention areas. Evidence of erosion prompted this project which has been successful at demonstrating how stormwater controls can be both attractive and environmentally friendly in design.  The rain gardens catch stormwater from Manteo Middle School’s parking lots and roof, and information on stormwater pollution and control has been incorporated into the science curriculum, along with signs installed to inform the public about stormwater problems and control.  Each grade level has designed a very unique and specific curriculum segment related to stormwater runoff and its effects on the environment. 

The middle school worked with the local NC Aquarium’s horticulturist to design native plantings for the two central stormwater retention areas surrounding the parking lots and buildings. They also worked with North Carolina Coastal Federation staff to plant gardens and construct a walkway through the largest garden, using volunteer labor and building materials donated by community businesses (for the boardwalk). Manteo Middle School partnered with members of Dare County Agriculture Extension Agent, Coastal Studies Institute in Manteo, NC Native Plants Society, and Dare County Master Gardeners. 

Project Administrator: 

Terry McGinnis, Principal

Manteo Middle School

1000 Highway 64/264

Manteo, NC 27954

(252) 473-5549

mcginniste@dare.k12.nc.us

Red Hill Elementary Riparian Buffer Demonstration

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $25,000

Total Cost of Project: $42,100

Red Hill Elementary School in the Back Bay watershed constructed a 35-foot riparian buffer zone adjoining Red Mill Elementary School and the adjacent neighborhood park to a non-tidal perennial stream tributary to Muddy Creek and Back Bay in Virginia Beach, VA.  Sediment loads, nonpoint source runoff, and sheet runoff from the school grounds and neighborhood have degraded and caused problems in the tributary stream by contributing excessive nutrients, pesticides, and further sediment. 

The objectives of the project were to establish a riparian vegetated buffer zone to filter nonpoint source runoff and help improve water quality, and to develop a demonstration project and outdoor education center for future projects. The project also included the development of an education program with a display and outdoor classroom to create greater stewardship and environmental awareness of the Back Bay watershed. 

For more information about Red Mill Elementary School, please visit: http://www.redmilles.vbschools.com/ 

Project Administrator: 

H. Clayton Bernick, III

Environmental Management Programs Administrator

City of Virginia Beach Department of Planning

2405 Courthouse Drive

Virginia Beach, VA 23456

(757) 385-4899

cbernick@vbgov.com 

Wet and Wild Detention Pond – P.S. Jones Middle School

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $25,000

APNEP supported a project called Wet and Wild for the creation of an outdoor classroom in and around a two-acre wet detention pond. The project has been constructed on the 88-acre tract of land on which P.S. Jones Middle School and John Small Elementary School are being built. A wheelchair accessible observation platform and pier were designed and constructed overlooking the detention pond to provide students and teachers with opportunities for scientific study, observation, and data collection. 

Plants selected for their documented ability to uptake and/or degrade toxins in pond water were purchased and introduced in the outdoor classroom. The project supports the development of a comprehensive environmental science and education curriculum and can provide opportunities for teachers to gain renewal credits in workshops on environmental and estuarine education.

Project Administrator: 

Phillip Boyd

Director of Plant Operations

1010 Pennsylvania Avenue

Washington, NC 27889

(252) 946-3735

pboyd@beaufort.k12.nc.us  

Williamston High School Low Impact Development Project 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $25,000

Williamston High School in Martin County, NC installed various low impact development practices on their campus. The integrated management practices of a cistern, level spreader, vegetative buffer, bioretention area, rain gardens & permeable pavement are treating runoff from the school site before it enters the Roanoke Basin waters. The practices are also being used to educate students, officials, and citizens of the importance of integrated management practices and how they can be used at the residential and commercial levels to treat runoff. 

 Students were involved in the design and implementation of this retrofit project as well as in the educational outreach about the site. The overall goal of low impact development is to design and maintain each development site to protect or restore the natural hydrology of the site so that the overall integrity of the watershed is protected. By installing these practices, Williamston High School can assist in treating some stormwater runoff before it enters the Roanoke River Basin. 

Williamston High School is a 13 acre site located in Martin County, NC near Highway 17 and US Highway 64.  Cooperative Extension will use the site as a demonstration project for schools, conferences, and design workshops.

Project Administrator: 

Dwane L. Jones

Asst. Area Specialized Agent, Environmental Education

NC State University, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

NC Cooperative Extension – Greene County

229 Kingold Blvd., Suite E

Snow Hill, NC 28580

(252) 747-5831

dwane_jones@ncsu.edu 

Buckridge Coastal Reserve Tide Gate

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $13,350

The Division of Coastal Management (DCM) constructed and installed a tide gate and appropriately sized culvert near Grapevine Landing on the Emily and Richardson Preyer Buckridge Coastal Reserve in Tyrrell County.  The goal of this project was to effectively install a tide gate that restricts unnatural saltwater intrusion. 

Restoration of the wetlands at the Buckridge site has been a primary goal since its acquisition. When increasing stress and mortality was noted on the 4000 acre Atlantic white cedar (AWC) tract on site, it drew the DCM’s first attention, especially due to the rarity of AWC forests.  The results of their monitoring suggested that the AWC stress and mortality are caused by a combination of salt intrusion (confirmed as seawater salt, not some other source) and altered hydrologic regime caused by the canal and road network.  DCM decided that addressing saltwater intrusion is their top restoration priority.  This is also important as saltwater can break down the peat soils of Buckridge, releasing large amounts of nitrogen, mercury, and a host of heavy metals. In talking with the Division of Marine Fisheries and researchers from ECU, anadromous fish may use the major canals as secondary habitat, so all tide gates are designed to allow for fish passage, as they are designed at Lake Mattamuskeet. 

Additionally, DCM has recently installed a hydrologic monitoring network along the main canals that will provide the data needed to adaptively manage water levels, helping restore the site while preventing hydrologic trespass.

Project Administrator: 

Dale Schmidt

DCM Administrative Officer

400 Commerce Ave. 

Morehead City, NC 28557

(252) 808-2808

Environmental Education Teaching Fellows Program

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $6,000

Total Cost of Project: $9,000

APNEP supported a 4-day outdoor environmental education learning experience for teaching fellows and other pre-service teachers in North Carolina.  The teacher training experience was held on Cape Lookout National Seashore.  Field experiences; hands on/inquiry based classroom techniques; and discussions focused on environmental issues (air quality, land use etc) pertinent in a coastal environment.  

Guest presenters from North Carolina environmental agencies and non-profits contributed their expertise to the fellows.  Participants were also introduced to the North Carolina Environmental Education Certification Program and received assistance and encouragement to apply for and complete this certification.  This workshop has been presented for the past 7 years with great success. One hope is that this program will expand and coordinate education projects about the Albemarle-Pamlico estuary, focusing both on environmental and economic issues. 

Project Administrator: 

Anne Taylor, Executive Director 

Environmental Education Fund

PO Box 25825

Raleigh, NC 27611

(919) 550-6186

annetaylor@eefund.org 

River Herring Sampling 
Amount Awarded by APNEP: $19,200
The River Herring Sampling project, conducted by the Division of Marine Fisheries was completed to gather additional information on the remaining populations of river herring. River herring, collectively referring to both blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis) and alewife (Alosa psuedoharengus), are experiencing rapid population crashes throughout their native regions. 
River herring populations are crashing due to a variety of reasons including loss of access to habitat, habitat destruction, fishery pressures, and declining water quality. The goal of this project was to gather information in a scientifically, economically, and socially sound way that will help assist in restoring river herring populations. 
Project Administrator: 
Ms. Sara E. Winslow 
Northern District Manager
NC Division of Marine Fisheries
NC Department of Environment & Natural Resources
1367 Highway 17 South
Elizabeth City, NC 27909
(252) 264-3911
sara.winslow@ncmail.net 
Coastal Growth Leadership Training for Local Governments
Amount Awarded by APNEP: $2,000
Total Cost of Project: $4,000
The North Carolina Coastal Federation partnered with fellow consortium members to develop a pilot workshop offered to elected officials. This workshop provided an overview of water resource science, land use and water resource connections, and implications and applications for local public policies including planning, zoning, and stormwater management. 
The goals of this project were to promote local and regional planning that protects the environment and allows for economic growth, as well as ultimately improving water quality by reducing sediments, nutrients, and toxicants from nonpoint sources. Participants gained increased awareness of the environmental impacts of certain local land use and economic development, and the link between economic viability and environmental quality; increased awareness of how collaborative efforts can benefit coastal communities and how to implement them; and an increased capacity to lead community efforts in adopting environmentally sustainable projects that benefit their communities as well. 
Consortium Members: NC Sea Grant, NC State University (Natural Resources Leadership Institute and Watershed Education for Communities and Officials), NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources (Division of Water Quality, Coastal Nonpoint Source Program, NC National Estuarine Research Reserve, and Albemarle Pamlico National Estuary Program), NC Coastal Federation, UNC School of Government,  UNC Coastal Studies Institute, and NC Eastern Region  
Project Administrator: 
Lauren Kolodij
NC Coastal Federation, Deputy Director
3609 Highway 24
Newport, NC 28570
(252) 393-8185
(910) 790-3275
laurenk@nccoast.org  
2009 Teacher Institute 
Amount Awarded by APNEP: $12,000
APNEP supported a summer teacher-training program through the Environmental Education Fund.  The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resource’s Office of Environmental Education administered this program, and have done so for several years to great acclaim. Through the Institute, participating teachers received intensive support from an established network of educational partners to provide inquiry, experiential, and research based instructional techniques. 
In addition, each teacher received instructional materials including curriculum-related videos, maps, posters, books, and other support materials for use with their students. The Summer Institute provided hands-on activities, site visits and investigations, technology applications, and standard course of study curriculum support for teachers. For years the institute has provided teachers with workshops on environmental and estuarine education, along with the opportunity to gain renewal credits in these workshops. 
The Institute is made possible through collaborative partnerships including the NC Office of Environmental Education, NC National Estuarine Research Reserve, many DENR divisions, the North Carolina Association of Environmental Education Centers, the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, and the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. 
For more information, please visit: 
http://www.eefund.org/
www.eenorthcarolina.org
Project Administrator: 
Anne Taylor, Executive Director 
Environmental Education Fund
PO Box 25825
Raleigh, NC 27611
(919) 550-6186
annetaylor@eefund.org 
CAC Project: Renewable Energy Discovery Zone
Amount Awarded by APNEP: $8,800
Kitty Hawk Elementary School created a Renewable Energy Discovery Zone that utilizes and showcases two forms of renewable energy both in immediate use and storage in a lab. The school has installed two solar panels on the roof of the fourth and fifth grade science lab that have their own DC to AC power converter for connection to the school grid and immediate use in lab. The other piece of equipment was a small marine wind turbine that stores energy in a battery. In addition to the installation of these two structures, the solar solution also has a software program which explains the solar panel activity and how much power has been generated and taken in by the solar panels. 
Through use of the solar panels and the wind turbine, Kitty Hawk Elementary School hopes that this project will engage students and the community in understanding renewable energy sources and potentially using these solutions in their homes. It is also very important to the school that their community, with their unique location on North Carolina’s barrier islands, learns how renewable sources of energy will aid in balancing the future needs of economic growth and the environmental future and preservation of the region. 
Kitty Hawk Elementary School worked closely with Dare County Schools and received assistance from the NC Solar Center in the installation and implementation of this project. 
Project Administrator: 
Dr. Greg Florence
Kitty Hawk Elementary School
16 S. Dogwood Trail
Southern Shores, NC 27949
(252) 261-2313
Claiborne Yarbrough
PTA/Green Team/Parent Volunteer
(252) 489-8238
CAC Project: Rainwater Harvesting System Demonstration 
Amount Awarded by APNEP: $6,220
The Pamlico County School System and The Pamlico County Cooperative Extension Service worked together to install a best management practice (BMP) in the form of a rainwater harvesting system. This rainwater harvesting system is located at the Pamlico County Schools bus garage and captures an estimated 188,697 gallons of water that fall on the rooftop annually. Installing this BMP has helped improve the water quality of the area; the rainwater harvesting system captures a portion of runoff that would otherwise flow freely into nearby rivers and ultimately to the Pamlico Sound. Additionally, the project has potentially reduced the amount of municipal potable water used at the bus garage as the rainwater is stored in cisterns and used later for washing buses. 
Along with reducing stormwater runoff and potable water consumption and use, the project has demonstrated to teachers and students the benefits of utilizing a rainwater harvesting system, and increased public awareness for the protection of natural water sources (rivers and sounds) from uncontrolled stormwater runoff. The tracking of the success of water usage from this cistern and reduction in municipal water waste at this BMP has shown the effectiveness of rainwater harvesting systems. Not only has this project improved water quality, reduced water consumption, and educated students and teachers in Pamlico County, but it will also be used in environmental education workshops across eastern North Carolina. 
The picture highlights four components of a rainwater harvesting system: 
1. The gutter system collects rainwater from the rooftop and directs it into the cistern. 
2. The cistern stores this rainwater for later use.  
3. The overflow pipe allows excess rainwater to leave the cistern in a controlled manner.
4. The outlet pipe, which is sometimes connected to a pump, draws water from the bottom of the cistern for use. 
Project Administrator: 
Pamlico County Cooperative Extension 
Charles Humphrey – Area Agent Environmental Education
Daniel Simpson – County Agent Horticulture/Environmental Education
PO Box 8
Bayboro, NC 28515
(252) 633-1477 – Charles Humphrey
(252) 745-4121 – Daniel Simpson
Charles_humphrey@ncsu.edu 
Daniel_simpson@ncsu.edu 
State of the Chowan and Pasquotank River Basins
Amount Awarded by APNEP: $25,000
The Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) used existing data sets to analyze the status and trends of water quality parameters within the Chowan and Pasquotank Rivers. By evaluating the existing data, they were able to determine gaps in data and where additional investigations and monitoring is needed. This project was important in attempting to integrate data and management programs across state boundaries in shared waterways. 
This project was one of many attempts the Albemarle-Pamlico National Estuary Program is making to assess the state of the entire APNEP ecosystem using indices of environmental quality. This program was a pilot study and starting point for broader assessments in the future which will serve as a means of communicating environmental quality to the public and assist in APNEP’s monitoring program. 
Project Administrator: 
Kirk J. Havens
Director, Coastal Watersheds Program
Virginia Institute of Marine Science
PO Box 1346
Gloucester Point, VA 23062-1346
(804) 684-7386
(804) 648-7179 (fax)
kirk@vims.edu 
 

Protecting Water Quality by Using Bridgemat Crossings on Forestry Options

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $24,000

Total Cost of Project: $71,000

The North Carolina Division of Forest Resources (DFR) purchased and installed  two sets of three fabricated steel panel “bridgemats” that, when used together, are positioned across narrow streams or ditches, creating a temporary bridge crossing suitable for forestry-related heavy equipment to operate.  Studies have consistently shown that stream crossings are among the most frequent sources of water quality degradation during any forestry operation. 

 To help protect the waters of North Carolina and promote the use of bridgemats, the NC DFR administers a Bridgemat Loan and Education Program.  This program allows bridgemats that are owned by DFR to be loaned out to loggers and other forestry contractors, on a short-term basis, for use during forestry-related operations.  Through this program, the targeted river basins, the Chowan and the Roanoke, were integrated into the existing DFR Program.  Bridgemats are a preferred Best Management Practice (BMP), and if used properly, typically result in the maximum protection of water quality when making a stream crossing. 

For more information about the NC Division of Forest Resources and their Bridgemat Loan and Education Program, please visit: http://www.dfr.state.nc.us/

Project Administrator: 

Tom Gerow, Jr – Forestry Specialist 

Forestry NPS Unit – N.C. Division of Forest Resources

1616 Mail Service Center 

Raleigh, NC 27699

(919) 733-2162 ext. 246

tom.a.gerow@ncmail.net 

Town of Gatesville Water Quality Demonstration Project

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $50,000

Total Cost of Project: $74,500

The Water Quality Demonstration Project resulted in acquired easements and buffers, a restored drainage system, stabilized ditch banks, improved water quality with a constructed wetland, and reduced flooding for the town of Gatesville in North Carolina.  Almost the entire town of Gatesville (population 350) in Gates County is drained by a ditch system which meanders almost one mile through town, behind houses, and into Bennett’s Creek which drains into the Chowan River.  This 160 acre watershed had a number of potential pollutants including: old septic tank systems, ditch bank erosion, small businesses, street and stormwater runoff, and accidental spills from its town setting.  Potential pollutants from these sources are now being trapped before they enter Bennett’s Creek and the Chowan River due to the channel restoration and the resulting wetland filtering system. 

An educational kiosk with technical information about the project and the wetland was posted and the Gates Soil and Water Conservation District is using the constructed wetland as an educational tool with school groups, in addition to monitoring the water quality in the drainage system above and below the constructed wetlands. The site is also included in water quality tours and workshops.  Data from this project is available for other small towns with similar drainage systems and potential water quality problems. Monitoring and project success is being captured by water quality monitoring data, the number of educational activities being held, and the public’s approval for a project of this type.

The Town of Gatesville partnered with the North Carolina Department of Transportation, the Town of Gatesville Public Works Department, and the Gates Soil and Water Conservation District.

Project Administrator: 

John Lane, Chairman 

Albemarle RC&D Council

PO Box 12

Gatesville, NC 27938

(252) 357-1113

Green Roof Symposium

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $4,000

The purpose of the symposium was to expose the green building community to the many facets of green roofs: their history and current usage, regulations that promote their use, the media, and the vegetation used in construction, research on their effectiveness, and case studies about their use for reducing non-point sources pollution. Increased awareness about the ways in which green roofs reduce non point source pollution and using these solutions will help decrease the runoff entering river basins and eventually estuaries. 

Project Administrator: 

Lucee Kossler

CALS Contracts and Grants

Campus Box 7644, NCSU

Raleigh, NC 27695

(919) 515-2288

annetaylor@eefund.org 

Wayne County Water Reuse/Rainwater Harvesting Project

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $3,000

This project supported the installation of a rainwater harvesting system at the Wayne County Agricultural Center to reduce the use of treated municipal water for uses such as landscaping and other non-potable purposes.  Impervious urban surfaces increase the amount of polluted stormwater runoff entering the waterways; thus, the system assists in minimizing erosion and stormwater runoff and has several benefits related to water quality and quantity:

- Reduces erosion and stormwater runoff, thus improving water quality; 

- Reduces the amount of treated municipal water used for landscaping and other non-potable purposes; 

- Controls peak stormwater flow; 

- Reduces stormwater runoff volume; 

- Reduces the demands on scarce surface and groundwater sources; and 

- Promotes water conservation. 

The Wayne County Agricultural Center has approximately 53,000 square feet of impervious surface.  The NC Cooperative Extension service is using the rain water harvesting system as a demonstration project for schools, conferences, and best management practice (BMP) design workshops.

Project Administrator: 

Dwane L. Jones  

Asst. Area Specialized Agent, Environmental Education

NC Cooperative Extension – Greene County

229 Kingold Blvd., Suite E

Snow Hill, NC 28580

(252) 747-5831

dwane_jones@ncsu.edu  

Greene County Water Reuse/Rainwater Harvesting Project

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $3,000

This project supported the installation of a rainwater harvesting system at the Greene County Agricultural Center to reduce the use of treated municipal water for uses such as landscaping and other non-potable purposes.  Impervious urban surfaces, of which the Greene County Office complex has approximately 53,000 sq. ft. of, increase the amount of polluted stormwater runoff entering the waterways; thus, the system assists in minimizing erosion and stormwater runoff and has several benefits related to water quality and quantity:

- Reduces erosion and stormwater runoff, thus improving water quality; 

- Reduces the amount of treated municipal water used for landscaping and other non-potable purposes; 

- Controls peak stormwater flow; 

- Reduces stormwater runoff volume; 

- Reduces the demands on scarce surface and groundwater sources; and 

- Promotes water conservation. 

The Greene County Office is located at the major intersection of US 13 and Highway 58.  The Cooperative Extension service is using the rain water harvesting system as a demonstration project for schools, conferences, and best management practice design workshops.

Project Administrator: 

Dwane L. Jones  

Asst. Area Specialized Agent, Environmental Education

NC Cooperative Extension – Greene County

229 Kingold Blvd., Suite E

Snow Hill, NC 28580

(252) 747-5831

dwane_jones@ncsu.edu  

Stevens Nature Center – Celebration of Nature 

“It’s a Waterful Life”

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $1,000

Total Cost of Project: $2,400

“It’s a Waterful Life!” was put on by the Stevens Nature Center at Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve for its yearly Celebration of Nature Event. The Celebration of Nature provides participants with an educational and recreational experience in a festival-style, outdoor setting.  May is National Wetlands Month, so in May 2005 the Stevens Nature Center celebrated wet and wild places and the plants and animals they support.  

There were hands-on activities, prizes and crafts for children along with displays, nature walks, entertainment, and light refreshments for the entire family.  Topics for the individual stations included streams and tributaries, temporary pools, ponds and lakes, and floodplain habitats.  Information on watersheds and how local creeks are linked to the Neuse River and ultimately our State’s estuaries were also featured.  

An emphasis was placed on the importance of water as a resource for habitat of native plants and wildlife, as well as what people can do to conserve and protect it. “It’s a Waterful Life!” celebration was a success thanks to The Friends of Hemlock Bluff, Hunter Industries, the Town of Cary; and volunteers from Green Hope High School Environmental Club, the Cary Teen Council, and individual volunteers. 

Project Administrator: 

Laura K. White, Nature Center Supervisor 

Stevens Nature Center

2616 Kildaire Farm Road 

Cary, NC 27511

(919) 387-5980

Laura.White@TownofCary.org 

Hoop Pole Creek Water Quality and Habitat Restoration Project

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $20,000

Total Cost of Project: $23,000

The North Carolina Coastal Federation (NCCF) and area students completed an oyster restoration effort within their existing oyster sanctuary at Hoop Pole Creek; the project was in keeping with NCCF’s water quality protection goals for their existing sanctuary site at Hoop Pole Creek.  This 31-acres of endangered maritime forest, salt flat, and wetlands in Atlantic Beach were preserved in 1997 with a $2.5 million grant from the North Carolina Clean Water Management Trust Fund.  

One of the main objectives of the project was to enhance existing efforts to restore the functions and values of degraded wetlands and vital fisheries habitats. Thus, the project also supported the development of an educational video of the student restoration activities and associated educational activities in order to begin implementing and expanding a program to restore wetlands.  The educational video was instrumental in broadening NCCF’s and the North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve’s education and outreach efforts about the importance of shellfish resources and water quality protection.  

 For more information about NCCF, please visit: www.nccoast.org

Project Administrator: 

Tracy E. Skrabal

Senior Scientist NCCF

131 Racine Drive Ste. 101

Wilmington, NC 28403

(910) 790-3275

tracys@nccoast.org  

North Carolina Aquarium Landscape Runoff and Water Quality Demonstration Project

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $35,000

The North Carolina Aquarium on Roanoke Island installed three cisterns to trap stormwater runoff from their buildings. Use of the cisterns to trap runoff water and then use it, saves energy and money; the runoff water first goes through a filtration process and is then distributed throughout the Aquarium and grounds for various uses. 

Uses for this water include: 

- Filling exhibit tanks in the Coastal Freshwater Gallery

- Irrigating native plants in the conservatory exhibit, Wetlands on the Edge

- Irrigating outdoor gardens

- Filling the sculpture pond

- Outdoor cleaning and maintenance

Along with the cisterns, the aquarium also planted rain gardens, filled with native plants that will collect any overflow from the cisterns. The rain garden is a constructed landscape that helps capture and clean stormwater runoff from rooftops, driveways, or any other impermeable surface. In rain gardens, bioretention, which is the tendency of plants and soils to remove pollutants, is a way pollution from stormwater is reduced. Additionally, the rain gardens help prevent flooding and erosion. The Aquarium has partnered with local schools and agencies to help develop more local rain gardens.

Project Administrator: 

Katherine Mitchell 

The NC Aquarium Society  

417 Blount St. 

Raleigh, NC 27601

(252) 473-3494

Katherine.Mitchell@ncmail.net 

Bunn High School Bio-retention Area Demonstration Project

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $9,600

The Environmental and Agricultural Science classes at Bunn High School designed and constructed a bio-retention area on a portion of their campus. A bio-retention area is an in-ground structure that filters the impervious runoff and combines stormwater treatment with landscaping.  Unlike a pond or wetland that retains stormwater, a bio-retention area retains water for short lengths of time. Therefore, plants that usually do not survive in wetlands and that have increased esthetic value are often used.  Plants may include dogwoods, irises, wax myrtle, river birch and ink-berry holly.

The bio-retention area at Bunn High School is a 560 sq. ft. surface area through which water permeates and is collected by a layer of sandy loam soil with tiles at the bottom.  The soil acts as a filter, thus enhancing the water quality upon exiting the bio-retention area. The benefits of the bio-retention area are two fold as it improves the quality of the water while improving the appearance of the area. Students at Bunn High School use the bio-retention area in a variety of lab experiments by monitoring water quality to determine the number of pollutants extracted by the bio-retention area. The High School has also educated the general public about the importance and effectiveness of this project.

The Bunn High School Agriculture, Science, English and Math Departments partnered with the Franklin County Cooperative Extension Service, Bill Lord (Neuse Team), and the Franklin County Soil and Water District to complete this project. 

Project Administrator: 

Charles Bass, Soil Conservationist

Franklin County Soil and Water Conservation

101 B South Bickett Boulevard

Louisburg, NC 27549

(919) 496-3137 ext. 3

North Carolina and Virginia Oil Recycling Project

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $12,000

The North Carolina and Virginia Oil Recycling Project was designed as an “on the farm” used-oil pick up to assist farmers in recycling their oil and also prevent excess oil from entering the groundwater. Before this project started, oil recycling centers often only had 250 gallon tanks for recycled oil. Individual farmers would store used oil in 55 gallon drums of 5 gallon buckets, which had high risks of spillage and would often times leak. 

The Project Team, made up of representatives from North Carolina and Virginia have worked together on this project to generate this bi-state initiative. The project consisted of the purchase and distribution of 85 double walled plastic oil-recycling containers along with the arrangement of an oil pickup schedule. In addition to the containers, fact sheets and brochures explaining the project were printed for outreach activities. The Oil Recycling Project was successful due to the partnerships with the Cooperative Extension Service, local Soil and Water Conservation Districts, APNEP, the Albemarle Resource Conservation and the Development Council, and the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. 

Project Administrator: 

Rodney Johnson, Project Coordinator  

Albemarle RC&D Council

730 N Granville St. Suite B

Edenton, NC 27932

(252) 482-7437 ext. 4

Citizens’ Oyster Gardening Program for North Carolina

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $31,946

Due to the low oyster population counts, this project was designed to start using citizens’ oyster gardens to help restore endemic populations and oyster reefs in estuaries and creeks. The objectives of the project were to develop and present a series of appropriate educational seminars in multiple locations to educate participants about oyster garden programs, train 50 partners, and implement water quality and oyster spat monitoring with a process for partners to enter data into a website. Along with the training program, a training manual and companion video or DVD was prepared for the partners. 

Another objective of the project was to operate the NC Sea Grant oyster hatchery with three outlined goals: produce 20 million eyed-larvae oysters from native NC broodstock, distribute seeded cultch (2 million oyster spat) to 50 partners, and provide hands-on opportunities for volunteer work at the hatchery and for planting and monitoring planted oysters. The trained partners of this project consisted of oyster gardeners and schools throughout the Tar-Pamlico, Neuse River and Pasquotank River Basins. By implementing this program, the NC Sea Grant Program hopes to work with the Division of Marine Fisheries to restore oyster numbers and their ecological functions to the estuaries. 

For more information on other states’ successful programs, and models for North Carolina, click on the following links: 

http://www.oystergardener.org/  (VA) and http://www.mdsg.umd.edu/oysters/garden/  (MD)

Project Administrator: 

NC Sea Grant Program

Box 8605, NCSU

Raleigh, NC 27695-8605

(919) 515-2456

North River Oyster Reef Restoration 

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $9,225

Total Cost of Project: $127,010

The North River Oyster Reef Restoration at Williston Creek created over 2 acres of reefs seeded with 300,000 juvenile oysters, in addition to a public outreach program promoting the merits of oyster habitat restoration through training, hands-on participation, and educational materials. The restoration project was prompted out of the North Carolina Coastal Federation’s mission to restore oyster habitat and populations within North Carolina’s priority growing areas. The North River project was the first oyster habitat project following the first phase of wetlands restoration from prior-converted farmland. Not only was the project a large on-the-ground restoration project, but it also included a heavy emphasis on community involvement and education.

At each site, racks and prepared shell bags were installed and oyster reefs created from 5,000 bushels of recycled oyster shell. Monitoring the growth of spat on the reefs and the subsequent oyster growth, along with analysis of the project was conducted by NCCF and Rose High School students. Following the project, various outreach programs were designed to involve and educate local school groups, other volunteers, and the community about the oyster reef restoration project including presentations at the NC State Fair and NC SeaFood Festival. 

Project Administrator: 

Tracy E. Skrabal

Senior Scientist NCCF

3806B Park Ave

Wilmington, NC 28403

(910) 790-3275

tracys@nccoast.org 

Virginia Watersheds SWAMP Assistance

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $15,000

The Southern Watershed Area Management Program (SWAMP) is a collaborative effort among the cities of Chesapeake and Virginia Beach along with the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission (HRPDC) and the Virginia Coastal Program focused on protecting the significant natural resources in the Southern Watershed Area while allowing for continued economic and residential development.  Data collection and analysis, research, report generation, and policy formulation have formulated the outlines of SWAMP. 

SWAMP’s goals are to: 

- Protect and enhance water quality for water supplies and natural resources conservation. 

- Preserve open lands to help protect and enhance water quality. 

- Maintain the rural character of the South Watershed, while providing for rural residential development. 

- Ensure compatibility of recreational activities and commerce with natural resource protection. 

- Sustain and encourage agricultural and forestall activities in the Southern Watershed. 

Project Administrator: 

John Carlock, Deputy Executive Director 

Physical Planner

Hampton Roads Planning District Commission

723 Woodlake Drive 

Chesapeake, VA 23320

(757) 420-8300

jcarlock@hrpdc.org 

Pactolus Elementary School Stormwater Wetland, Pitt County

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $31,200

The Stormwater Wetland at Pactolus Elementary School captures runoff from the school’s parking lot and roof drains that would otherwise enter directly into Grindle Creek of the Tar-Pamlico River Basin as untreated stormwater runoff. In addition to improving water quality in the Tar-Pamlico River Basin, the constructed wetland will also educate the community on the impacts of stormwater runoff, serve as an outdoor classroom and educate local students about wetlands. Under the Tar-Pamlico Stormwater rule, the wetland will also meet educational requirements and serve as a retrofit site. 

Pactolus Elementary School partnered with the Pitt County Planning Department, N.C. State’s Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, the Cooperative Extension Service, and other local agencies. As schools account for large levels of impervious cover, Pactolus Elementary School, like many other schools have used their wetland demonstration project as a retrofit way to treat stormwater runoff and allow students opportunities to sample water quality and survey the vegetation and animal life of the wetland. Additional information is also supplied with placards and informational posters at the project site. 

Project Administrator: 

James Rhodes, Planning Director 

Pitt County Planning Department

1717 W. Fifth Street

Greenville, NC 27834

(252) 902-3250

Conservation Easement Workshops

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $6,000

North Carolina State University conducted a set of two workshops on the conservation easements for landowners in the 5 North Carolina river basins of the APNEP region. The workshops covered the use of conservation easements as well as programs, laws, regulations, tax incentives, and other assistance that provided opportunities for agencies, non-profit organizations, landowners, and others to preserve land. The workshop also addressed the continuing education need of Appraisers, Attorneys, Foresters, Planners and other professionals. 

The workshops helped promote responsible stewardship, protection, and conservation of natural areas by filling general education needs for landowners, cooperative extension personnel, government officials and employees of nonprofit organizations who wish to work in the area of land preservation and conservation, especially within the Albemarle-Pamlico Sounds region.  

Project Administrator: 

Ted Feitshans

Extension Specialist/Lecturer

North Carolina State University

(919) 515-4670

FerryMon

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $40,000

FerryMon is a UNC-CH/Duke Ferry-based water quality monitoring program attempting to fill the informational void in data on the water quality and habitat change in the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuary System (APES).  FerryMon uses ferries as cost-effective data gathering vessels to routinely gather water quality information while out on the water.  The APES is North Carolina’s most important aquatic resource and the Nation’s second largest estuary which supports a large fraction of the Southeastern U.S. fishery, as well as tourism, and recreational and sports fishing. 

Thus, the goals of FerryMon are to assess and predict the relationships between human nutrient & pollutant inputs, algal blooms and associated water quality changes, and ecosystem response; provide information critical to long-term water quality and fishery management; and develop FerryMon as a national model for real-time assessment of coastal water quality. Monitors on ferries test for temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll biomass, geographic position (GPS), nutrients and diagnostic algal pigments, colored dissolved organic matter, and total suspended solids. 

FerryMon is a partnership among NC DOT ferries, UNC-CH and Duke, and NCDENR Division of Water Quality. 

For more information, please visit: http://www.unc.edu/ims/paerllab/research/ferrymon/images/index.html 

Project Administrator: 

Scott Blackwood, Acting Senior Director

Research Administration, UNC-CH

(919) 962-4675

Tryon Palace Wetlands Reconstruction

Amount Awarded by APNEP: $75,000

The Tryon Palace Wetlands Reconstruction involved grading and site preparation for planting the wetland area. A bulkhead and erosion control measures were also installed. The project included the construction of a boardwalk, pier and sun shelter around the stormwater and riverine wetlands.  Once completed, various educational programs were developed and used to educate visitors about wetlands. 

Project Administrator: 

Kay Phillips Williams

Tryon Palace Historic Site & Gardens

610 Pollock Street

New Bern, NC 28560

(252) 524-4919

kwilliams@tryonpalace.org  

 

61563 FEEDBACK

Your input is valuable to us. Please send us your feedback.

What type of feedback would you like to send?*

Ask a Question Report a Problem Have a Concern Make a Comment

(If you would like us to respond please include your phone or e-mail.)

Your Question has been sent. Thank you!

An internal server error prevented Your Question from being sent.
Please try again later, or call Toll-Free (877) 623-6748 for immediate assistance.

Please complete all highlighted items

Your Problem has been sent. Thank you!

An internal server error prevented Your Question from being sent.
Please try again later, or call Toll-Free (877) 623-6748 for immediate assistance.

Please complete all highlighted items

Your Concern has been sent. Thank you!

An internal server error prevented Your Question from being sent.
Please try again later, or call Toll-Free (877) 623-6748 for immediate assistance.

Please complete all highlighted items

Your Comment has been sent. Thank you!

An internal server error prevented Your Question from being sent.
Please try again later, or call Toll-Free (877) 623-6748 for immediate assistance.

Please complete all highlighted items

*If you are a DENR employee with an I.T. issue, please submit a DOTS ticket.